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Author Topic: Administration, dealing with families, etc.  (Read 4896 times)

Offline jharrisece

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Administration, dealing with families, etc.
« on: April 02, 2008, 04:39:59 PM »
I don't know where to put this so I just 'stuck it under Children's behaviour- -even though my issue is parental behaviour!

Actually, this is sort of a rant / asking how others do things, etc.!

First off, I do not have a daycare, I have a preschool.   

Secondly, the issue I am facing is this:  I just received an email from a parent who has their child in drop-in (I don't have a drop in on a usual basis but this year I had two families that really wanted their children in my program and asked if they could have this option if anyone is away).  So I call these two families when someone is away sick and their fee is $14 a class ($1 less than the actual fee used for the full timers).  Anyways, one of the full time parents went to the drop-in parent and said since they are paying full time fees that she shouldn't have to pay for drop-in as she is taking a spot already paid for; she should be getting it for free.  Well, I was angry that the parent would say this (although I have noticed that she is a pot-stirrer) because it isn't her business first off and secondly, if she is unhappy then she should leave.  I replied to the parent that asked me about this, that this is typical practice in the field that if a child is drop-in then they are charged for the use of the space but of course the child who is away pays full time for the first option to use the space.  (Oh, and I do calculate 2 sick days from the full time fees for the year plus if they miss a day and someone is away but no drop-in is using it, then they can come in for free another time)  I know this is the way things are here where I live and I am just wondering how others do things.  I will say though, this is the third issue with the 'pot stirrer' in the past two weeks.   

Offline Laura

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Re: Administration, dealing with families, etc.
« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2008, 03:15:23 PM »
I don't know where to put this so I just 'stuck it under Children's behaviour- -even though my issue is parental behaviour!

Actually, this is sort of a rant / asking how others do things, etc.!

First off, I do not have a daycare, I have a preschool.   

Secondly, the issue I am facing is this:  I just received an email from a parent who has their child in drop-in (I don't have a drop in on a usual basis but this year I had two families that really wanted their children in my program and asked if they could have this option if anyone is away).  So I call these two families when someone is away sick and their fee is $14 a class ($1 less than the actual fee used for the full timers).  Anyways, one of the full time parents went to the drop-in parent and said since they are paying full time fees that she shouldn't have to pay for drop-in as she is taking a spot already paid for; she should be getting it for free.  Well, I was angry that the parent would say this (although I have noticed that she is a pot-stirrer) because it isn't her business first off and secondly, if she is unhappy then she should leave.  I replied to the parent that asked me about this, that this is typical practice in the field that if a child is drop-in then they are charged for the use of the space but of course the child who is away pays full time for the first option to use the space.  (Oh, and I do calculate 2 sick days from the full time fees for the year plus if they miss a day and someone is away but no drop-in is using it, then they can come in for free another time)  I know this is the way things are here where I live and I am just wondering how others do things.  I will say though, this is the third issue with the 'pot stirrer' in the past two weeks.   

HMMMM....I've been there before myself with 'pot sitters'.  They don't make life easy do they?  Firstly, with your second issue, your contract is with the full-time parent and this parent is paying the fee for their child.  The other parent should not have stuck her 'nose' into the situation.  You may want to look into changing the word drop-in to nursery school.  Many parents misinterpret the word drop-in to mean free.  I don't think the parent should have a free spot, if this is what she is looking for then she should look for other "free" options within the community.

If the 'pot stirrer' continues to be a problem, i would say one more issue(although you make the final decision)  i would ask her to leave.

Secondly, I'm not sure what you exactly mean by your first issue.  But i just thought i would post these definitions:

preschool
Of, relating to, intended for, or being the early years of childhood that precede the beginning of elementary school.

A school for children who are not old enough to attend kindergarten; a nursery school.

day∑care
Provision of daytime training, supervision, recreation, and often medical services for children of preschool age, for the disabled, or for the elderly.


Both are similar in what the functions are, however one focuses more on the ages 3-5 rather the whole spectrum.(Correct me if i am wrong).

Has someone offended you with using the wrong terminology?

« Last Edit: April 03, 2008, 03:24:03 PM by Laura »

Offline jharrisece

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Re: Administration, dealing with families, etc.
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2008, 08:28:15 PM »
In BC the licencing reg's for daycare and preschool are almost all the same. Except for the
ages for preschool are 30 months thru Kindergarten but the different daycare catagories have various ages. Oh, and staff qualifications are different too, requiring your ECE to operate a preschool.  There is of course certain space requirements as well.   Otherwise the program requirements are the same as for childcare and they are very vague.  It is up to the preschool to submit a very detailed program plan, philosophy, etc. that reflects the 'school' operations of the program.   I actually have three K's in my program and it is a licenced preschool.  The name of my program is 'A World of Wonder Nursery School'.  There are certain licencing requirements around the name as well.  Only licenced preschools can have 'school' in their name (whether it is preschool or nursery school, they both mean the same)  I just thought that there may be some misunderstanding of the program I was operating, some may think it was daycare.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2008, 08:30:57 PM by jharrisece »

Offline spud

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Re: Administration, dealing with families, etc.
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2008, 02:03:16 PM »
very interesting definitions/conversation here. Just like I cant stand being called a babysitter...I am not a babysitter...I am a daycare provider!
Anyone care to add those definitions lol?

Offline CareDC

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Re: Administration, dealing with families, etc.
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2008, 06:12:16 PM »
You do, of course, realize that it's not that parents don't like spending money on their kids but rather their perception of what it is you do. Paint it whatever color you want, but before parents accept that you are not a babysitter, but rather a childcare provider you will have problems raising rates. After all, parents don't find it a problem when they send their kids into private schools to get better education. Changing beliefs and traditional thinking is one tough job to do!!!

Why don't you write a definition of a childcare provider? I'm sure it will clarify things for parents who read this forum.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2008, 08:54:56 AM by gdcAdmin »

Offline spud

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Re: Administration, dealing with families, etc.
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2008, 11:57:19 AM »
To start, I am an early childhood educator, thus called a qualified ECE child care provider. A babysitter is someone you call to babysit for a couple of hours here and there while you go out...you do not expect a babysitter to do anything except keep your kids safe while you are away, they can be teenagers for all you care and you want this kind of care as cheap as possible-as it is for your own recreation. An early childhood educator or childcare provider is expected to care for your child while you work, they are expected to be qualified to do a good job, having first aid training, other childcare related training, and attend workshops and are expected be up to date with todays acceptable/ best child rearing practices.  A child care provider is expected to provide stimulating activities and provide experiences that will expand a childs growth and development. While the parent is working the child has a hired professional to assist them with their child s play (which is your childs work) You expect that provider to teach your child what is right and wrong and to be consistent with your values... and you expect the person to prepare your child for entering school life and to be social.  I should hope that a parent understands it takes training to do a good quality childcare job- and a qualified individual expects to get paid accordingly..a babysitter can be a teenager with very little experience...as it is only for a couple hours and occasional and often at night- a babysitter is not likely going to "mold" your child or have a huge impact / influence on their development as is a daycare provider is. A qualified daycare provider also have conflict resolution training to help children learn how to positively address conflict in a positive nurturing way...teenage/unqualified uneducated babysitters do not address children in the same way as a child care educator would and cannot or wouldnot teach your child the skills that an educated daycare provider knows.

Furthermore..look at it this way, a quality childcare is an investment in your childs future..a babysitter will solve this moments need..but nothing more.
If you want to keep your quality centre/home in operation..be prepared to pay for the excellent service you receive. Dont you want the best most qualified person to care for your child when you cannot? It how the parent views their child- and their day..I would think the cost factor should not be the only determining factor as to where to place your child...its the kind of care your child is going to recieve that should matter.
Are most parents aware that the first 5 years of a childs life is the most important time for them? They learn the most during those years..and those years set them up for the rest of their lives and will determine how they deal with things in the future.  I would have to think if parents realized this, then they would want to pay for the best individual around to care for their child, so their child has the best possible start and the best possible opportunity in life.  DO you want your child to be a highschool grad ? or do you want a college/ university grad?
« Last Edit: April 12, 2008, 12:10:56 PM by spud »

Offline jharrisece

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Re: Administration, dealing with families, etc.
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2008, 12:10:49 PM »
Also, a teenaged babysitter gets paid more than parents pay for childcare!  My 13 year old is paid $5 to $7 an hour to go sit and watch tv while the children sleep.  I know a licenced family childcare that closed as she said her son at 15 made more money babysitting than she did running her daycare - an ECE at that!  On top of that, there is huge business expenses in running a daycare.  I closed in '98 and my 'real cost to operate was $703 per month, per child but I only charged $425 per month and $25 a day.  My business took 70% of the fees to run (because excellent quality care is costly!) worked out what parents were actually paying per hour and it was .74 an hour.  Ten years later the average cost here is now $700 per month or $35 a day - finally it has gone to where it should and the government grant has been created here too.

Offline spud

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Re: Administration, dealing with families, etc.
« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2008, 12:24:22 PM »
I do not have a problem raising rates...its the cost of care. I am full- and if one family doesnt take the occasional opening that comes open because they are lookign for cheap care, then another family who values quality childcare will pick  it up and be a great family to serve...I would rather wait for the right match then to get an ungrateful family who just wants cheap care...go to the crappy centre down the street that apparently has openings then..and see how happy you are there...my daycare families take the rate increases as they come, and are grateful to still have me here for their kids.  Otherwise I would go work somewhere else that would pay me what I am worth.  When a person calls or inquires and their first question is my rates, I usually know thats what is important to them, I do not back down on my rates...I will refer them to all kinds of people who care for kids in the area, and the best families always return to me.. cuz they know I m the best!! LOL

Offline Icare

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Re: Administration, dealing with families, etc.
« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2008, 05:46:15 PM »
I have more to say on this topic tonight, but nap time here is nearly up, so I will say SPUDNIK,that WE do parallel in a lot of our thinking..I have opted out on families who's first and primary concern was the fee...some will even try to sway me... to lower their fee!!

 I inform them that my fee tears are policy set and I am in no position to lower ones fees over another families' fees...this is unethical and certainly not proper business etiquette!!!

As for the 'pot stirrer'... I will comment more tonight on that...
Till then...just stand your ground....
TTYL,
Robyn ;)

Offline jharrisece

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Re: Administration, dealing with families, etc.
« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2008, 05:56:48 PM »
spud- good for you for having that attitude!  More people need that!  I was the same when I had my daycare (both family and group), if someone's first question (or anytime before they asked about licenced, training, years experiences, what a day looked like, group size, etc.) was the fee, then I knew they weren't the family I wanted to accept!  There were also the ones that read the policies and were so desperate for space that they would agree with everything THEN once they were in try to sway you.  They didn't last long!  If I ever had a daycare again I would be charging what the program cost was and nothing less!  It has always shocked me how it is the majority of families (in my experience) that will choose lesser quality and pay more for it because they don't want to actually be involved in their children's program. I just had this talk the other day with another centre who was saying how she couldn't figure out how parents would pay more for less.  It happens and I have even heard people say they don't want to know what goes on in their child's day, don't want the caregiver to do anything with their child, do not want to have someone who cares about their child's development - 'just pay $35-$40 a day and put them in front of the tv!  Don't let me hear that he/she needs to see someone about speech/difficulties with behaviour/etc!'  Then WE the TAXPAYERS have to foot the bill once they are needing supports, causing problems, etc.  Our work is not for the here and now it is for the future!

 

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