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Author Topic: Lotions, powders may pose risks to infants  (Read 4222 times)

Offline CareDC

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Lotions, powders may pose risks to infants
« on: February 04, 2008, 12:09:21 PM »
Study shows babies vulnerable to hormone-disrupting chemical found in commonly used personal care products.

"Researchers in the United States have found phthalates, a hormone-disrupting chemical used in many plastics and personal care products, in every one of a group of 163 babies they tested.

More than 80 per cent of the infants had at least seven different types of phthalates, a finding attributed to the widespread use of baby shampoos, skin lotions, and baby powders that contain the chemical. The researchers, who are publishing their results today in the journal Pediatrics, theorized that the children are absorbing the chemicals through their skin when parents use personal care products on them."

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080204.wplastic04/BNStory/specialScienceandHealth/home

Offline spud

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Re: Lotions, powders may pose risks to infants
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2008, 12:28:31 PM »
WOW, thank you for that article!! I have often been cautious about the fact that many of our foods are stored in unsafe plastic (and to my understanding this is all made in China? correct me if im wrong please) such as margarine containers etc... I never thought of how the lotions etc are absorbing all the bad phthalates adn being transfered to our systems through our skin...it seems as though we need to go back to the good ol basics of homemade items and glass storage eh!

Offline CareDC

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Re: Lotions, powders may pose risks to infants
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2008, 12:33:32 PM »
They add all kinds of horible chemicals into personal products. This study had only scratched the surface of the problems. Makes you wonder what's wrong....lotions or smoking :)

Offline spud

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Re: Lotions, powders may pose risks to infants
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2008, 12:44:20 PM »
Greenpeace says Waterloo Region is wrong to send plastic waste to Asia because workers who process it there may be at risk.

"It's not safe for the environment. It's not safe for the people," spokesperson Zeina Alhajj said yesterday from Greenpeace International in the Netherlands.

"The conditions are not at all good. If you have a mixture of a variety of plastic being melted together, you do have toxic emission coming out of it."

Alhajj co-ordinates a toxic contamination campaign for the world environmental organization.

She contends that poorly paid Asian recyclers aren't protected from health and safety risks, as they would be in Canada.

Greenpeace has documented children in India who recycle plastic bags, Alhajj said.

"We're not talking about a recycling factory," she said. "We're talking about backyards, around the corner, under the bridge.

"The western world needs to take full responsibility for its own waste generation, instead of dumping it in the yard of the developing countries."

Waterloo Region sends one-third of the plastics from blue boxes to Asia.

The waste, up to 680 tonnes last year, is not recycled in North America.

The region refuses to landfill this waste, as other Ontario communities do, but provides the garbage for free or for a small fee to buyers who pay shipping costs.

Local officials don't ask how the waste is handled in Asia.

But unlike Greenpeace, Regional Chair Ken Seiling is not persuaded there's a problem.

China takes most of the plastic waste shipped overseas, Seiling said.

"This isn't hazardous waste, like radioactive stuff or chemicals," he said. "It's straight plastics.

"We can't make the assumption that everything in China is wrong. I'd want to see some evidence that there was something improper taking place."

He looks at overseas shipments as effective recycling.

"China is a fairly sophisticated industrial producer," Seiling said. "I suspect that some of the plastic that's going over there is coming right back into Canada, in the form of plastic goods.

"Canadians buy millions of dollars worth of plastic goods out of China, and if you believe in a recycling philosophy, then this is actually following a recycling philosophy."

Alhajj agrees our waste plastics are likely coming back to us.

"We would call it downcycling, basically," she said.

"Melting this plastic, or using it in another form of material that is resold again to the western world, for $1 items or items that are extremely cheap and extremely irrelevant in our life."

Plastics heading to Asia are marked by recycling codes No. 3 through No. 7, imprinted on the bottom.

They include squeeze bottles for ketchup and mustard, some yogurt containers, plastic shells for cookies and muffins, and cleaning products such as dish soap.

Greenpeace questions the energy consumed to ship our local garbage around the world.

"What we advocate is recycling at source, or recycling nearby, where the waste is being generated," Alhajj said.

"You have, as well, the environmental impact of shipping all this product, all this waste, all across the globe, from one end to the other, that is emitting a lot of toxic contamination from the shipping industry."

Seiling is not unsettled by global shipping of waste.

"If you follow that argument, then we shouldn't be shipping timber, and iron ore and everything else that we send to other countries," he said.

"If you follow that argument, then we shouldn't trade anything that requires transport."

Alhajj describes garbage shipping as a cheap way to dump a headache on someone else.

"Recycling these components in the West is either extremely expensive, or requires a lot of investment in sorting the different type of plastics," she said.

"So instead of dealing with all that, you just basically ship all this waste back to countries like China and India, where they are sold in the market extremely cheap."

Seiling describes overseas shipping as an acceptable way to save space at the Erb Street West landfill.

Incineration of waste is another alternative and many are bothered by that prospect, he said. "Everybody's pushing for us to recycle," Seiling said. "Every little bit counts along the way."

jouthit@therecord.com

OF OUR RECYCLING, ONE-THIRD GOES TO ASIA

CODE / TYPES OF PLASTICS

THESE ITEMS ARE NOT SHIPPED TO ASIA

1 Soft drink, edible oil, and liquor bottles; peanut butter jars; containers for toiletries, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals.

2 Rigid containers, crinkly retail bags, milk and juice jugs, margarine tubs, detergent bottles, motor oil containers.

THESE ITEMS ARE SHIPPED TO ASIA

3 Shampoo bottles, mineral water bottles, liquor bottles, household chemical containers, film wrap on meat packages.

4 Grocery bags, dry cleaners' bags, garbage bags, ice cream tubs.

5 Coating on milk cartons, shrink wrap, bottle caps, yogurt and margarine tubs, transparent candy wrapping.

6 Foam (meat trays, egg cartons, coffee cups); Crystal (clear takeout containers, disposable utensils, drinking straws).

7 Squeezable bottles for ketchup, condiments.

SOURCE: PEACE AND ENVIRONMENT RESOURCE CENTRE (WWW.PERC.CA/WASTE-LINE/RRR/PLASTIC/)


Offline CareDC

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Re: Lotions, powders may pose risks to infants
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2008, 12:50:11 PM »
I think we are trying to fix the problem, and not to address the root of it. Our society is so mesmorised with shiny packaging, and the convenience of plastic begs that we don't even put an effort into looking for ways to deal with that. The industry is simply delivering what the society wants. We want our foot to stay fresh for a year, and the only way to do this is to add chemicals that will make that happen. We ignore to look at long-term effects because there is a short-term gain.

Offline spud

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Re: Lotions, powders may pose risks to infants
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2008, 12:53:35 PM »
To increase their profit margins, American manufacturing and importing companies have been eager to move their operations overseas even though their imported products frequently expose everyday Americans to great harm.

We now know that our own federal government actually inspects less than 1% of all the goods imported by American companies.

While millions of tainted, adulterated, dangerous and toxic imported products have been discovered, we have no way of knowing about the toxicity or safety of the 99% of imports that have never been inspected.

All kinds of imports are substandard, dangerous or deadly - tires, fake drugs and auto parts, contaminated food, pet food and toothpaste, and lead-laden baby bibs.

What should we do about this? How can we protect ourselves from this growing threat?

http://www.everydaycitizen.com/2008/01/will_we_protect_our_children_f.html

Offline Laura

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Re: Lotions, powders may pose risks to infants
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2008, 02:55:33 PM »
This all leads me to believe that there is no safe solution unless you grow it yourself or make it yourself.  As for lotions or powders, i use them as little as possible...now i'm thinking about going back to our grandparents home remedies, but are they any better?

Offline Laura

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Re: Lotions, powders may pose risks to infants
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2008, 03:00:50 PM »
What else is interesting is that the plastics used in making baby bottles (such as Gerber) have a chemical (PVC) coating on them which is toxic if the bottle is warmed or if hot beverages is poured into them.  (Should have a number 7 inside a triangle)

Offline spud

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Re: Lotions, powders may pose risks to infants
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2008, 01:09:50 PM »
Quite honestly I do not think there has been enough advertising on the dangers of these chemicals/plastics..especially when heated... I had no idea it was that bad, I can just imagine how much is consentrated in our systems! I hope greenpeace or our mps or someone gets this issue under control.  Plastic is cheap but deadly I think.
So, what exactly does these chemicals do to the reproductive system? Is this why girls are entering puberty so much earlier now a days and why they are so much bigger than we were?

Offline CareDC

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Re: Lotions, powders may pose risks to infants
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2008, 05:19:29 PM »
Quite honestly I do not think there has been enough advertising on the dangers of these chemicals/plastics..especially when heated... I had no idea it was that bad, I can just imagine how much is consentrated in our systems! I hope greenpeace or our mps or someone gets this issue under control.  Plastic is cheap but deadly I think.
So, what exactly does these chemicals do to the reproductive system? Is this why girls are entering puberty so much earlier now a days and why they are so much bigger than we were?

It all boils down to money. Companies have to answer to their shareholders, so they do everything in their power to make the value of the share grow. Warning the public of the dangers involved in consuming the product is not a good strategic idea for moneymaking. Until our products are strictly regulated (or money is of no issue :)) we will not see any changes.

 

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