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Author Topic: Supplies  (Read 2562 times)

Offline Laura

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Supplies
« on: February 06, 2008, 03:06:22 PM »
What types of supplies are needed?

Offline Laura

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Re: Supplies
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2008, 03:08:21 PM »
Some supplies to start the list off:

crayons
paints
paint brushes
pencils
pencil crayons
paper
construction paper
paper towels
toilet paper
hand soap

Offline spud

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Re: Supplies
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2008, 11:52:08 AM »
First Aid Kit - When Was the Last Time You Inspected Yours?

first aid kits

The facility shall maintain at least one readily available first aid kit wherever children are in care, including one for field trips and outings away from the facility and one to remain at the facility if all the children do not attend the field trip. In addition, a first aid kit shall be in each vehicle that is used to transport children to and from a child care center. Each kit shall be a closed container for storing first aid supplies, accessible to child care staff members at all times but out of reach of children. First aid kits shall be restocked after use, and an inventory shall be conducted at least monthly. The first aid kit shall contain at least the following items:

a) Disposable nonporous gloves;

b) Scissors;

c) Tweezers;

d) A non-glass thermometer to measure a child's temperature;

e) Bandage tape;

f) Sterile gauze pads;

g) Flexible roller gauze;

h) Triangular bandages;

i) Safety pins;

j) Eye dressing;

k) Pen/pencil and note pad;

l) Syrup of ipecac (use only if recommended by the Poison Control Center);

m) Cold pack;

n) Current American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) standard first aid chart or equivalent first aid guide;

o) Coins for use in a pay phone;

p) Water;

q) Small plastic or metal splints;

r) Liquid soap;

s) Adhesive strip bandages, plastic bags for cloths, gauze, and other materials used in handling blood;

t) Any emergency medication needed for child with special needs;

u) List of emergency phone numbers, parents' home and work phone numbers, and the Poison Control Center phone number.

Note: Syrup of Ipecac was recommended for first aid kits prior to 2004. Because of recent research, it is no longer considered the best practice to include it in first aid kits. Instead caregivers should call their Poison Control Center or 911 for instructions when they think a child may have taken a poison. See http://nrc.uchsc.edu/CFOC/updates.htm.


RATIONALE: Facilities must place emphasis on safeguarding each child and ensuring that the staff members are able to handle emergencies. In a study that reviewed 423 injuries, first aid was sufficient treatment for 84.4% of the injuries (30). The supplies needed for pediatric first aid, including rescue breathing and management of a blocked airway must be available for use where the injury occurs.


COMMENTS: Many centers simply leave a first aid kit in all vehicles used to transport children, regardless of whether the vehicle is used to take a child to or from a center, or for outings.



Offline Laura

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Re: Supplies
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2008, 02:24:28 PM »
geez..how can i forget that....lol the most important supply to have.

 

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