Child developmental Milestones Preschoolers Three Years

header image≡≡ Source of Canadian daycare listings and child care information ≡≡

Developmental Milestones - Preschoolers Three Years

GROWTH AND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT

  • height increases 2 to 3 inches per year; average height is 38 to 40 inches or nearly double the child’s original birth length
  • gains 3 to 5 pounds per year; weighs and average of 30 to 38 pounds
  • heart rate (pulse) averages 90-110 beats per minute
  • respiratory rate is 20-30 depending on activity level; child continues to breathe abdominally
  • blood pressure reading is 84-90/60
  • growth of legs is more rapid than arms giving the three year old a taller, thinner, adult-like appearance
  • has full set of “baby” teeth
  • needs to consume approximately 1500 calories daily visual acuity is approximately 20/40 using the Snellen E chart
  • pot bellied due to position and size of the internal organs
  • swaybacked-the spinal cord is not fully developed
  • boys tend to vary in height more than girls
  • growth slows down, the baby fat begins to shed, and the child looks leaner
  • child is less top-heavy
  • height and weight should rise together
  • arms, trunk, and legs lengthen
  • legs grow faster than the rest of the body
  • bones become denser
  • walks erect
  • toilet trained
  • more verbal and more social than the 2 year old

MOTOR DEVELOPMENT

  • walks up and down stairs independently, using alternating feet; may jump from bottom step, landing on both feet
  • feeds self without assistance
  • jumps in place
  • shows improved control of crayon or markers when drawing; uses vertical, horizontal and circular motions
  • holds crayon or marker between first fingers and thumb (tripod grasp)
  • turns pages of a book one at a time
  • enjoys building with blocks
  • builds a tower of eight or more blocks
  • enjoys playing with clay; pounds, rolls and squeezes it
  • may begin to show preference for use or right or left hand
  • manipulates large buttons and zippers on clothing
  • washes and dries own hands; brushes own teeth
  • usually achieves complete bladder control during this time
  • balance is more stable
  • better coordination, balance and stronger legs
  • learn to pedal properly
  • learn to run
  • beginning to learn to jump-first jumps will be all leg and no arm movements, but with practice will start to use arms
  • some children can thread large wooden beads on a shoelace
  • may hold a pencil in the adult way
  • hop with both feet
  • pedals a tricycle
  • throws a ball underhanded
  • cuts paper
  • works a puzzle of several pieces
  • draws simple shapes
  • sits on chair, ankles crossed
  • walks forward, sideways, or backwards, pulling big toys
  • pedals and steers a tricycle
  • may jump off bottom step
  • prefers much more complex activities
  • can ride tricycle and push a wagon
  • runs, but her stopping and starting are controlled
  • does not bump into people or things

PERCEPTUAL-COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT

  • listens attentively to age-appropriate stories
  • likes to look at books and my “read” to others or explain pictures
  • plays realistically - feeds doll, puts it down for nap, covers it up
  • - hooks truck and trailer together, loads truck, drives away making motor noises
  • attempts to draw, copies circles, squares, and some letters
  • sorts objects logically on the basis of design, shape or color; however, chooses color or size predominantly as basis for classification
  • names and matches primary colors: red, yellow, blue
  • counts objects out loud
  • sight and hearing continue to improve
  • visual acuity is approaching adult levels
  • can use complex cues to help them determine relative distance, or depth of field
  • uses symbols in play (ie: feeding a doll)
  • animistic and egocentric, unable to reason, incapable of perceiving the way groups of objects are similar
  • capable of discriminating between animate and inanimate objects
  • able to share with other children
  • recognizes and remembers objects seen before and engages in deferred imitation
  • mentally works out steps involved in solving a simple problem
  • begins to develop representational skills, recognizing symbols and words and forming mental images
  • begins categorizing by forming concepts and sorting and labeling objects and events by group
  • begins to develop a sense of right and wrong
  • cuts paper with scissors
  • build a nine brick tower
  • controls pencil between thumb and first two fingers
  • makes and names pictures
  • visual-motor coordination is more advanced than it was at 2
  • in her block play, her drawings and her imitations shows more direction than a year before

SPEECH AND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT

  • talks about known objects, events and people not present
  • answers simple questions appropriately
  • calls attention to self, objects or events in the environment
  • asks for desired objects or assistance
  • vocabulary has grown to 300 to 1000 words
  • recites nursery rhymes, sings songs
  • speech is 80% intelligible
  • uses the preposition “in”
  • indicates negatives by inserting "no" or "not" before a simple noun or verb phrase, "not baby"
  • answers “what are you doing?” “what is this?” and “where?” questions dealing with familiar objects and events
  • ability to communicate complex ideas
  • child’s vocabulary, both understood and spoken grows at a fast rate
  • abstractions and concepts such as past and future become real
  • children talks at this age about people, in particular their mothers and fathers
  • can understand more than they can say
  • language becomes more difficult than
  • more language they have, the faster thinking will progress
  • begins speaking in short, simple sentences
  • identifies and explains use of household objects
  • understands more vocabulary words than he or she can say
  • recognizes that language has a specific structure and rules
  • loves hearing favorite stories
  • speaks with modulated pitch and volume
  • can repeat some nursery rhymes
  • may count to 10
  • language is truly phenomenal
  • 3 year olds language is still more circumscribed than what it will be later
  • young children talk to themselves while they are playing, eating or engaging in activities with other children
  • language is an accompaniment to action
  • language is a form of practice

PERSONAL-SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

  • seems to understand taking turns, but not always willing to do so
  • friendly; laughs frequently; is eager to please
  • joins in simple games and group activities, sometimes hesitantly
  • uses objects symbolically in play; block of wood may be pushed as a truck, aimed as a gun, used as a ramp
  • engages in make-believe play alone and with other children
  • shows affection toward children who are younger or children who get hurt
  • sits and listens to stories up to 10 minutes at a time; does not bother other children listening to story and resents being bothered
  • sense of self deepens
  • early stages of fear of not being able achieve may become evident, as the first signs of fearing ridicule
  • may be frightened by everyday objects
  • uses spoon and fork at table
  • affectionate and less rebellious
  • begins to grasp differences between past, present, and future
  • may be dry day and night
  • no longer needs to assert individuality
  • accepts her separateness as she does that of others
  • wants to be accepted and liked by others and tries hard to please
  • takes great pride in doing little errands

DEVELOPMENTAL ALERTS

Check with a health care provider or early childhood specialist, if by the fourth birthday, the child does not:

  • have intelligible speech most of the time
  • understand and follow simple commands and directions
  • use 3 to 4 word sentences
  • ask questions
  • help with dressing self

The information provided should be used as a general guideline and for general information. Children are unique individuals. No two children grow and develop at the same rate. If you have any questions concerning your child's development, contact your pediatrician.

©2017 godaycare.com. All rights reserved

Privacy and Terms of Use | Contact Us | Read our FAQ | Resources